The 47 Ronin: The Faithful Samurai
 
 
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No.1.7 Sakagaki Genzo Masakata seated on a broken slab

Genzō was superior with the spear but also an inordinate lover of sake, which he drank from morning to night. In fact, he tied a one-quart sake bottle to his spear and drank from it even as he moved about.
He avoided fancy foods and hewed to a plain regime. He also wore rough clothes, projecting, in this respect, an unassuming, abstemious character.
After the fall of Akao, he lived in Honjō Hayashida Chō, never forgetting his debt to his lord. On the day of that man’s death, every month, he did not go near the sake he loved more than rice, and would spend the day sunk in inconsolable grief, a sad figure.
One day, Fuwa Katsuemon came to see him and suggested they go to the Kabuki, where a kyogen about a lord who shed blood in the palace was a great success. They went and saw Takenojō play the part, but when it was over they were filled with indignation and vented it by beating up the producer, Hanai Saisaburō.   Ōboshi heard about it and let them know that men who have a supreme objective in mind do not get into altercations of this kind. This is what happens when one mixes uncompromising loyalty with a little too much sake.

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References:
David R. Weinberg. Kuniyoshi: The faithful samurai. Hotei Publishing – Leiden, The Netherlands, 2000, no.11.6. pp.156,157.

 
 

 

 
 
 
 
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